Tag Archives: Mt. Rainier

Success of first Fuji “X” Photo Workshop posted

“See Why Fujifilm’s X Photo Workshop Has Expanded to Three More Locations” by Bill Murray, ResourceMagOnline

 

sunset in mt rainier national park by jack grahamI can’t tell you how much Bill Fortney and I appreciate having other authors writing about our photo workshops and this article especially so.  It’s about the great success of our first Fuji “X” System photo workshop, held at Mt. Rainier National Park (Washington) last August. Both Bill and I had a wonderful time showing our workshop attendees how to take this wonderful new technology Fuji is providing, and using it to make better photographs.

 

We have three more Fuji “X” workshops coming up in 2016: the Great Smoky Mtns in April,  Olympic National Park in May, and Acadia National Park in October. Check them out … we’d love to have you come along!

by jack graham, forest greenery, mt rainier

Timing is Everything!

Recap of our recent Fuji “X” Photo Workshop on Mt Rainier, Washington – August 2015

Images and Text ©Jack Graham

Timing is everything. That kind of sums it up for me for this past weekend’s workshop on Mt. Rainier.

While driving through the Columbia River Gorge in Oregon last year, Bill Fortney and I began planning our very first workshop dedicated only to users of the Fuji “X” system.  We announced this event mid-2014 and it quickly sold out.  Basically this workshop is no different from the ones we have been doing together for the past few years, but with heavy emphasis on the Fuji cameras and amazing lenses.

JG-Jack-Bill-FujiGuys
(Left to Right) Justin Stailey, Bill Fortney, Jack Graham, Geoff Hinze, Lewis Navarro

We were fortunate and honored to be joined at this event by Justin Stailey, Fuji’s Senior Product Manager from their head office on the east coast, Geoff Hinze, one of Fuji’s National Account Directors (Geoff lives here in Washington) and Lewis Navarro, Fuji’s West Coast Tech specialist. What a line-up! Thanks you guys and thank you Fuji.

sunset in mt rainier national park by jack grahamFolks, this company (Fujifilm) really gets it. They know their customers. They listen. They are doing the right thing, as well as making some of the best products anywhere for us. I have no doubt they will continue to bring us cutting edge cameras and some amazing glass. As I always say, having these tools just gives us the chance to make a good image. We still have to work hard to grow as photographers.

As always we had our “meet and greet” on Wednesday night, where we get to know each other, go over goals for the workshop and have some good company. Typically we don’t go out to photograph on that evening, but due to a few factors I suggested we take a quick ride and make a few images. First, the mountain and adjacent valleys were shrouded in smoke from a nearby fire south of the park. Second, the weather forecast was looking iffy as the weekend progressed.

mt rainier forest by jack grahamWe all came back to the hotel that evening with some great images with some amazing color as well as excitement for the coming sunrise on Thursday morning – we were not disappointed! Thursday was a transition day for us weather wise. In the high Cascades weather changes feature dramatic clouds. We had them for sure. Numerous lenticular clouds were in the sky making for amazing drama. At times it looked like we were being invaded by space ships. Timing is everything! We all nailed sunrise at Reflection Lake on Thursday morning. As Thursday progressed so did the incoming weather system and with it the dramatic clouds and light. We spent the balance of the day up at the “Sunrise” area in the northeast part of Mt. Rainier National Park,  at a few locations and then driving back to Paradise in the dark.

stream in mt rainier national park by jack grahamSunrise was about 6:30 AM. I walked out of the Paradise Inn (at about 5,500 feet elevation) about 5:10 and was greeted by a downpour. Bad news … no sunrise, but good news was this rain put a good amount of water into the small streams, creeks and waterfalls. It’s been a long hot summer here in the Pacific Northwest and the rain was welcomed by everyone. (Especially the folks east of the Cascades who were and still are dealing with a 400+ square mile forest fire). We all ate a good breakfast and by about 7:45 the rain stopped. We had a great morning and early afternoon photographing the landscape with the low hanging clouds and fog as well as flowing waterfalls and streams. Timing is everything.

There is no Internet or mobile signal where we were staying at the Paradise Inn. However, up at Sunrise we located a signal and were able to access the weather forecast. This was a good thing as by Friday the forecasters were predicting a major storm for Saturday with very heavy rain and wind. They were correct.

jack graham photo workshop classSaturday morning was dry but overcast. You could feel the storm approaching. The rain held off until late morning as did the wind. Fortunately, we were all inside doing our image reviews and presentations during the worst of the storm. Again, timing! Saturday evening cleared until late, when the rains returned in earnest. By the time we ended our workshop on Sunday it was pouring rain, windy and cold on the mountain. When Bill and I departed Mt. Rainier on Sunday it was 38 degrees and raining.

We were extra fortunate with the weather. Seattle forecasters called this storm “The Strongest Summer Storm in West Coast History.” Click HERE for a great synopsis. We had great light, dramatic clouds, great waterfalls and stream locations, etc. All in all it was a great event.

mist in the trees, mt rainier, jack grahamWith Bill, me and three Fuji folks, we were able to give our attendees a lot of personal time. We worked with customizing their cameras to take advantage of everything Fuji has to offer. We had numerous Fuji bodies and lenses for our attendees to try out. Again, having the folks from Fuji with us was a great experience for everyone.

What’s ahead? In 2016 Bill and I are scheduling three such Fuji “X”-only events: The Smoky Mountains in mid-April, Olympic National Park in early May and Acadia National Park (Maine) in October. Stay tuned for some major announcements regarding two of these three events. Yes, they will sell out quickly!

Mt Rainier, Reflection lake by Jack GrahamTo add to the “Timing is everything” thought, tonight it’s still showering here in Washington and the prediction for later this week for Mt. Rainier is cold, rain and even snow! Has winter arrived on the mountain? Probably not, but things are definitely in transition.

Below is today’s forecast—Guess where I’ll be tomorrow!!   —-JG

SPECIAL WEATHER STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE SEATTLE WA
417 AM PDT TUE SEP 1 2015

WAZ513-567>569-020000-
OLYMPICS-CASCADES OF WHATCOM AND SKAGIT COUNTIES-
CASCADES OF SNOHOMISH AND KING COUNTIES-
CASCADES OF PIERCE AND LEWIS COUNTIES-
417 AM PDT TUE SEP 1 2015

…SEVERAL INCHES OF SNOW WILL FALL IN THE MOUNTAINS ABOVE 6000 FEET WEDNESDAY THROUGH THURSDAY…

THE SNOW LEVEL WILL BE AROUND 5500 TO 6000 FEET WEDNESDAY THROUGH THURSDAY…AS AN UNSEASONABLY DEEP UPPER TROUGH MOVES OVER THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST. PRECIPITATION AMOUNTS OF A QUARTER INCH TO AN INCH ARE LIKELY OVER THE HIGHER MOUNTAINS DURING THIS PERIOD…WITH LOCALLY UP TO ONE AND A HALF INCHES ON MOUNT BAKER.

THAT MEANS THAT A TOTAL OF 2 TO 6 INCHES OF SNOW CAN BE EXPECTED AT ELEVATIONS ABOVE 6000 FEET TUESDAY THROUGH WEDNESDAY…WITH A FOOT OR MORE OF SNOW AT THE HIGHER ELEVATIONS.

What is a Fuji Workshop?

bill fortney, stream in mt rainier national parkJack and I just completed the first of several planned Fuji Workshops, and I get a number of questions about just exactly what is a Fuji Workshop?  Let’s take a trip down memory lane.  In the days of film, seems like yesterday but it is going on 15 years now, the most common kind of camera was the Single Lens Reflex (SLR).  Yes, of course, there were rangefinders and view cameras, but the vast majority of us were SLR shooters.  Later the SLR became the Digital Single Lens Reflex (DSLR) and it had many advantages, mostly a clean, clear view of the world, through the lens.  With film this was just great since the final image didn’t look anything like what you saw through the cameras viewfinder anyway.  You see, when digital cameras came along images were “processed” in the camera.  Digital Single Lens Reflex cameras “still” only show you what the lens sees when viewing through the viewfinder, not what the processed image will look like.  Mirror-less cameras process the image according to “your” desires, and let you actually see that processed image through the viewfinder.

bill fortney mt rainierThe point of a Fuji Workshop is to teach students how to take this wonderful new technology and use it to make better photographs.  We teach the students how to use the “What You See Is What You Get” viewfinder to get correct exposure by simply dialing it in with the exposure compensation dial!  We also teach how to use the film simulation feature to get a great variety of options every time you push the shutter release.  We find all the ways that the mirror-less revolution has made image making easier and better.

The Fuji X-System is a great combination of full featured, retro controlled bodies, and stellar lenses of virtually all focal lengths and speed ranges!  Long glass and macro lenses are on the way and then the system will be pretty complete!

bill fortney, sunset at mt rainierThe bottom line is pretty simple, very capable photographers with years of experience, including Jack and I, are using the Fuji System to make some of the best images of our lives.  We’ve worked hard to find all the ways to make the most of this incredible system.

I’ve included some images from this Mt. Rainier Fuji Workshop … enjoy!

reflection lake at mt rainier by bill fortney